This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Disclosure of separate bond value under CSPP and PEPP'.


• 
EUROPEAN  CENTRAL  BANK 
EUROSYSTEM 
Christine Lagarde 
President 
ECB-UNRESTRICTED 
Paul Schreiber 
Campaigner on the Supervision of Financial Actors 
Reclaim Finance 
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxx.xxx 
21 October 2020 
LS/CU2020/282 
Confirmatory application for public access to ECB documents 
Dear Mr Schreiber, 
On 1  July 2020 the ECB received your confirmatory application requesting that the Executive 
Board reconsider the decision of the Director General Secretariat of 29 June 20201  not to 
disclose the identified data in relation to your application for access to documents of 22 April 
2020. To reiterate, the ECB identified a confidential internal database containing the 
requested data,  "documents which contain the separate bond value of CSPP [corporate 
sector purchase programme] and PEPP [pandemic emergency purchase programme] assets 
held by the ECB and the Eurosystem". 

On 22 September 2020, in line with Article 8(2) of Decision ECB/2004/3and owing to an 
exceptional workload, the ECB extended the stipulated time limit for replying by an additional 
20 working days. 
In line with the requirements of Decision ECB/2004/3, the Executive Board has given careful 
consideration to your confirmatory application,  as well as to the assessment made and the 
decision taken by the Director General Secretariat in response to your initial request. 
Following this review, the Executive Board has decided to uphold the decision of the Director 
General Secretariat. The Executive Board reiterates that the confidential internal database 
containing the requested data, the separate bond value of CSPP and PEPP assets held by 
the ECB and the Eurosystem, which was identified as a document falling within the scope of 

See the letter of the Director General Secretariat of 24 July 2020 {LS/PS/2020/21 ). 

Decision ECB/2004/3 of 4 March 2004 on public access to European Central Bank documents {OJ L 80, 
18.3.2004, p. 42), as last amended by Decision ECB/2015/1 {OJ L 84, 28.3.2015, p. 64). 
Address 
Postal address 
European Central Bank 
European Central Bank 
Tel.:  +49 69 1344 7300 
Sonnemannstrasse 20 
60640 Frankfurt am Main 
Fax:  +49 69 1344 7305 
60314 Frankfurt am Main 
Germany 
E-mail: xxxxxx.xxxxxxxxx@xxx.xxxxxx.xx
Germany 
Website: www.ecb.europa.eu


ECB-UNRESTRICTED 
your request, cannot be disclosed since disclosure would undermine the interests protected 
under the second indent of Article 4(1 )(a) ("the protection of public interest as regards the 
financial, monetary or economic policy of the Union or Member State") of Decision 
ECB/2004/3. 
In the confirmatory application you contend that the reasons underpinning non-disclosure of 
the identified data do not appear valid in the light of your arguments. The Executive Board 
considers that none of the arguments in your confirmatory application call into question the 
ECB's reasoning and the grounds given for the non-disclosure of the requested data. 
The Executive Board wishes to underline that the Director General Secretariat's letter 
provided comprehensive background information and explained in detail the reasons why the 
data you requested could not be disclosed. 
The following paragraphs explain the Executive Board's decision. 
Protection of the public interest as regards the financial, monetary or economic policy 
of the Union or a Member State 

Pursuant to the second indent of Article 4(1 )(a) of Decision ECB/2004/3, the ECB shall refuse 
access to documents where disclosure would undermine the protection of the public interest 
as regards the monetary policy of the Union. The disclosure of the requested data may 
seriously compromise the effectiveness of the Eurosystem's monetary policy implementation 
measures under the corporate sector purchase programme (CSPP) and the temporary 
pandemic emergency purchase programme (PEPP) and their monetary policy objectives, 
distort price discovery and impair market functioning, creating serious risks to the monetary 
policy transmission mechanism and the outlook for the euro area. 
In this regard, you have pointed out that refusal to disclose the data on the basis of the 
protection of the public interest "does not account for the fact that 'the protection of public 
interest' also entails the disclosure of detailed information on the climate impact of the ECB's 

operations". The Executive Board would like to note that the concept of "protection of the 
public interest" must be interpreted by reference to its wording and the purpose and general 
scheme of the rules of which it forms part. As is apparent from the wording,  "protection of the 
public interest" within the meaning of Article 4(1 )(a) of Decision ECB/2004/3 does not entail 
the disclosure of detailed information on the climate impact of the ECB's operations. The 
public interest which is protected by the exception laid down in Article 4(1 )(a) of Decision 
ECB/2004/3, and which is relied upon in this case to refuse access to the requested 
document, is the monetary policy of the Union. The public interest to which you refer has a 
different sense, as it relates to the disclosure of information. Such an interest is rather 
reflected in the aim of Decision ECB/2004/3. The aim of Decision ECB/2004/3 is to give the 
public wider access to ECB documents, so as to reflect the intention expressed in the second 
Address 
Postal address 
European Central Bank 
European Central Bank 
Tel.: +49 69 1344 7300 
Page 2 of6 
Sonnemannstrasse 20 
60640 Frankfurt am Main 
Fax: +49 69 1344 7305 
60314 Frankfurt am Main 
Germany 
E-mail: xxxxxx.xxxxxxxxx@xxx.xxxxxx.xx
Germany 
Website: www.ecb.europa.eu


ECB-UNRESTRICTED 
sub-paragraph of Article 1  of the Treaty on European Union, which enshrines the concept of 
openness, to mark a new stage in the process of creating an ever closer union among the 
people of Europe,  in which decisions are taken as openly as possible and as closely as 
possible to the citizen (Recitals 1 and 3 to Decision ECB/2004/3). Nonetheless, it is apparent 
from Recital 4 and Article 4 of Decision ECB/2004/3 that the right of access to ECB 
documents is subject to certain limits based on reasons of public or private interest which are 
laid down in the exceptions provided for in Article 4 of Decision ECB/2004/3.  Under the 
exception relied upon in this case, namely that provided for in the second indent of Article 

4(1)(a) of Decision ECB/2004/3,  the ECB must refuse access to a document where its 
disclosure would undermine the protection of the monetary policy of the Union. Whilst in view 
of the objectives of Decision ECB/2004/3, exceptions to the right of public access to ECB 
documents must be interpreted and applied strictly, once it has been established that the 
exception relating to monetary policy applies, as in this case. This exception has an absolute 
character and does not provide for the possibility of demonstrating the existence of an 
overriding public interest. 

The Executive Board would like to emphasise that the Director General Secretariat's letter of 
29 June 2020 included sufficiently specific reasons as to how the disclosure would undermine 
the protection of the public interest as regards the monetary policy of the Union. 

There are two aspects to which the Executive Board would like to draw your attention once 
again: 

First, the disclosure of detailed, disaggregated data on the securities purchased and held 
under the CSPP and the PEPP (such as the separate bond value of CSPP and PEPP assets 
held by the Eurosystem) in a centralised and complete manner would lead market participants 
to draw inferences about the Eurosystem's holdings and adjust their own behaviour according 
to assumptions established on the basis of the information made available. The distribution of 
purchases across issuers/originators and other dimensions mainly reflects the market 
conditions at the time of the purchases and the intention to maximise the impact of 
interventions with respect to general credit conditions, while minimising distortions in market 

prices.  Disclosure of the precise composition of the CSPP and PEPP portfolio may,  for 
example, be perceived by the market as indicating that the Eurosystem differentiates between 
securities with varying characteristics and specificities and thus jeopardise market liquidity. 
Market participants could anticipate the Eurosystem's purchasing behaviour in relation to 
specific events, for example, events affecting corporate bond markets (such as drastic 
changes in volatility or company-specific events) and underestimate the importance of market 
liquidity for the Eurosystem's purchasing behaviour.  More specifically, market participants 
could infer a replication of this behaviour if similar events were to occur in the future and pre­
position accordingly to take advantage of this information at the expense of the Eurosystem. 
Granting market participants access to detailed, disaggregated information regarding the 

9'��fe�d PEPP portfolios, such �§Joo §88ft{�!e bond value of CSPP and PEPP assets held 
European Central Bank 
European Central Bank 
Tel.: +49 69 1344 7300 
Page 3 of 6 
Sonnemannstrasse 20 
60640 Frankfurt am Main 
Fax: +49 69 1344 7305 
60314 Frankfurt am Main 
Germany 
E-mail: xxxxxx.xxxxxxxxx@xxx.xxxxxx.xx
Germany 
Website: www.ecb.europa.eu


ECB-UNRESTRICTED 
by the Eurosystem, would in turn have adverse market consequences. It would limit the 
capacity of monetary policy transmission channels to function efficiently owing to the 
unwarranted distortions that would follow changes in behaviour by other market participants. 
This could compromise the effectiveness of the intervention measures and, potentially, their 
monetary policy objective. 
In summary, as it was emphasised in the Director General's letter, the CSPP and PEPP 
purchases are intended to have a positive effect on all targeted asset categories.  Since 
market participants are not familiar with the individual assets considered by the ECB and the 
Eurosystem national central banks (NCBs), they will tend to invest broadly in the entire 
categories targeted, supporting the effective implementation of monetary policy across the 
broader market. 
Second, disclosure of the requested detailed data may lead to market fragmentation and 
undermine the level playing field on which issuers, originators and other actors in the 
corporate bond markets operate. This would jeopardise the EC B's intention to minimise the 
impact of the purchase programme implementation on regular price discovery processes and 
market functioning. 
The minimisation of unintended consequences is key principle for ensuring a market-neutral 
implementation of the CSPP and PEPP.  In this context, market neutrality means that, while 
the ECB aims to affect market interest rates, it does not want to suppress the price discovery 
mechanism and impair market functioning. To that end, purchases under the CSPP and 
PEPP follow a benchmark, which is designed to be neutral in the sense that it reflects 
proportionally all outstanding CSPP/PEPP-eligible corporate bonds.The structure of the 

See,  in this regard,  paragraph 80  of Versorgunqswerk v ECB, T-376/13 ,  ECLl:EU:T:2015:361 : ("[ ... ] 
disclosure of information about the method used under the [Securities Markets Programme] SMP could 
undermine intervention measures having an objective which is identical or similar to the one pursued 
through the SMP.  These types of programmes are aimed at encouraging market participants to invest in a 
category of government bonds, possibly even before the ECB and the Eurosystem NCBs purchase any, in 
order to take advantage of the price trends triggered by those purchases.  They are liable to have a 
positive effect on all of the bonds in the category targeted.  Since the market participants are not familiar 
with the bonds preferred by the ECB and the Eurosystem NCBs, they will tend to want to invest broadly in 
the entire category targeted.  By contrast, if the market participants were to be granted access to the 
detailed, broken down information contained in Annexes and B to the Exchange Agreement, the 
effectiveness of the intervention measures and, ultimately,  the monetary policy, would risk being affected, 
as would the internal finances of the ECB and the Eurosystem NCBs. In that scenario, the market 
participants would tend to want to establish prognoses in order to determine more specifically the type of 
government bonds purchased by the ECB and the Eurosystem NCBs and to concentrate their acquisitions 
on those types of bonds.  On the one hand,  there is risk that it would lead to higher prices for the types of 
bonds identified by the market participants as liable to be purchased by the ECB and the Eurosystem 
NCBs.  Since those bonds would in fact fit in with the preferences of the ECB and the Eurosystem NCBs, 
both might be led either to purchase those types of bonds at higher prices or to purchase other bonds not 
fitting in with their preferences.  On the other hand, the ECB and the Eurosystem NCBs could be led to 
purchase bonds of a type other than the category targeted, in order to encourage market participants to 
invest in all of the bonds in that category,  instead of concentrating on certain types of bonds'). 

For information on the PEPP, see Pandemic emergency purchase programme (PEPP) on the ECB's 
website.  For information on the CSPP, including a semi-annual breakdown of the CSPP portfolio and 
CSPP-eligible corporate bond universe by economic sector, credit rating and country of risk, see Asset 
purchase programmes on the ECB's website. 
Address 
Postal address 
European Central Bank 
European Central Bank 
Tel.: +49 69 1344 7300 
Page 4 of6 
Sonnemannstrasse 20 
60640  Frankfurt am Main 
Fax: +49 69 1344 7305 
60314  Frankfurt am Main 
Germany 
E-mail:  xxxxxx.xxxxxxxxx@xxx.xxxxxx.xx
Germany 
Website:  www.ecb.europa.eu


ECB-UNRESTRICTED 
benchmark (and the associated limit framework) is aimed at making sure a diverse portfolio 
can be built and avoiding undue market distortions. In addition, the ECB pursues market 
neutrality and closely monitors the impact of its operations on market liquidity and collateral 
availability. 
In relation to your arguments that "it is not clear that the additional disclosure of bond value 
would lead market participants to significantly modify their behaviour[. . .]  and that if the bond 
values were to be published at the same time, they would give little usable information to 
market participants", 
that  "the ECB provides no credible evidence or data to justify that the 
disclosure of separate bond value would 'introduce undue volatility' or 'distort price discovery' 
and that "whether information is published or not, the ECB's asset purchases already impact 
'price discovery' and asset prices", the Executive Board would like to note that the Director 
General Secretariat's letter of 29 June 2020 included sufficiently specific explanations 
addressing these points and reiterates the explanations that have been provided. Providing 
further (data) evidence on the effects of the disclosure would actually mean revealing 
confidential information which would harm the interest protected under the second indent of 
Article 4(1)(a) of Decision ECB/2004/3.
For the above reasons, the Executive Board maintains that the disclosure of the requested 
data would harm the efficiency of these two above-mentioned programmes and create 
serious risks to achieving the desired monetary policy accommodation, which ultimately may 
negatively affect the sustained adjustment in the path of inflation rates to levels below, but 
close to, 2% in the medium term. The efficient implementation of the asset purchase 
programmes (APP), including the CSPP, is crucial for supporting a sustained adjustment in 
the path of inflation that is consistent with the ECB's primary objective of price stability. The 
successful implementation of the PEPP is critical for an effective monetary policy 
transmission mechanism aimed at delivering the favourable financial conditions that are 
necessary to support the economy, in view of the severe risks to the outlook for the euro area 
posed by the COVID-19 pandemic.
Taking into account the points made above, the Executive Board confirms the decision of the 
Director General Secretariat that access to "documents which contain the separate bond 
value of CSPP [corporate sector purchase programme] and PEPP [pandemic emergency 
purchase programme] assets held by the ECB and the Eurosystem" 
cannot be granted. 
Remedies 
5  See paragraph 55 of Versorqungswerk v ECB, T-376/13, ECLl:EU:T:2015:361.
8  See Decision (EU) 2020/440  of the European Central B ank of 24  March 2020  on a temporary pandemic
emergency purchase programme (ECB/2020/17). 
Address 
Postal address 
European Central Bank 
European Central Bank 
Tel.: +49 69 1344 7300 
Page 5 of6 
Sonnemannstrasse 20 
60640  Frankfurt am Main 
Fax:  +49 69 1344 7305 
60314  Frankfurt am Main 
Germany 
E-mail:  xxxxxx.xxxxxxxxx@xxx.xxxxxx.xx
Germany 
Website:  www.ecb.europa.eu



ECB-UNRESTRICTED 
Please note that, as set forth in Article 8(1) of Decision ECB/2004/3, in the event of total or 
partial refusal the applicant may have recourse to the remedies available under Articles 228 
and 263 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union. 
Yours sincerely, 
Address 
Postal address 
European Central Bank 
European Central Bank 
Tel.: +49 69 1344 7300 
Page 6 of 6 
Sonnemannstrasse 20 
60640 Frankfurt am Main 
Fax: +49 69  1344 7305 
60314 Frankfurt am Main 
Germany 
E-mail: xxxxxx.xxxxxxxxx@xxx.xxxxxx.xx
Germany 
Website: www.ecb.europa.eu