This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'minutes of WTO SPS and TBT meetings'.



Ref. Ares(2019)2304627 - 01/04/2019
 
EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
DIRECTORATE-GENERAL FOR HEALTH AND FOOD SAFETY 
Directorate D – Food chain: stakeholder and international relations 
D2 – Multilateral International Relations 
DIRECTORATE-GENERAL FOR TRADE  
Directorate D – Sustainable Development, Bilateral Trade Relations, 
D3 – Agriculture, Fisheries, Sanitary and Phytosanitary Market Access, Biotechnology 
Brussels, 01. April 2019 
SANTE.D2/TRADE.D3 AH/WM/tt (2019) 2550648
Report of the 74th WTO SPS Committee meeting (18-22 March 2019, Geneva) 
EU DELEGATION:
DG SANTE: C
  . .A
  l
A va
v r
a e
r z
e  An
A t
n ol
o ine
n z
e , A.
A  H
  o
H r
o va
v t
a h,
h  ,M. .C
  as
a tel
e llina,
a  ,P
  . .M
  yl
y ona, ,B
  .
B  .Lo
L ga
g r,
r  ,C
  . .M
  as
a sot 
Be
B r
e n
r a
DG TRADE: F.
F  Cot
o u
t r
u ni
n ,i A. Ha
H u
a r
u u
r m
u , W. .M
  ai
a er
e ,
r  F. Tri
r sta
t nte
t , B 
B Mo
M lend
n ows
w ka 
SUMMARY
Once again, the EU policies dominated the Committee’s proceedings. Many countries took the floor 
to  question  the  EU  SPS  measures  in  several  areas,  notably  Plant  protection  products  including
specific  MRLs  pesticides,  transitional  measures,  Endocrine  disruptors and  Veterinary  Medicinal 
Products.  Brazil  complained  again  about  the  EU  import  restriction  on  poultry  meat  due  to 
presence of salmonella and China repeated some previous concerns.  
On the offensive side, the EU raised new concerns against Korea in relation to its countrywide bans 
on EU Member States due to local outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI), which 
Korea lifts only after lengthy review procedures. The EU also reiterated several concerns: Russia’s 
(RF) import restrictions on ruminants from areas affected by bluetongue and on fishery products 
from Estonia;  South Africa and China bans on poultry due to HPAI; the USA continuous delay in 
authorising  EU  exports  of  apples  and  pears;  Indonesia  lack  of  transparency  and  undue  delays  in 
their approval procedures for animal products; and the import restrictions imposed by several trade 
partners  allegedly  due  to  BSE.  In  addition,  the  EU  urged  trade  partners  to  respect  international 
standards and WTO rules on regionalization of African swine fever (ASF) and HPAI.
Two  thematic  sessions,  respectively  on  equivalence  and  on  fall  armyworm  (FAW),  took  place 
within  the  framework  of  the  Fifth  Review  of  the  SPS  Agreement.  The  EU  presented  the  existing 
legislative  measures  to  prevent  the  introduction  of  FAW  into  the  EU  and  the  technical  assistance 
and training programs available to developing countries. 
Brazil led an informal consultation on the implementation of the Agreement, while two informal 
meetings took place to discuss all the proposals presented within the Fifth review of the Agreement 
and the follow up to be given to the discussion on FAW. On the margins of the Committee, the EU 
presented to WTO members the implementation of the new legislation on animal health.
Fourteen  bilateral  meetings offered  opportunities  for  the  EU  to  push  for  key  market  access 
interests. 
***
REPORT
I.
Trade concerns raised by the EU 
1

The EU raised the following STCs1:
New: 
South Korea: lack of progress in recognising regionalisation for HPAI and undue delays 
in restoring disease-free status to Member States after an outbreak was eradicated. South 
Korea  (Ministry  of  Agriculture)  claimed  that  country-free  status  was  restored  for 
Germany,  which  is  correct,  although  a  public  commenting  period  is  still  ongoing. 
However,  to restore trade with South Korea, Germany will have to be approved also by 
the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety, a process that has not started yet. 
Previously raised:  
South Africa: Import restrictions on poultry due to HPAI  South Africa reported in the 
bilateral meeting that pending applications are evaluated and it is hoped that approvals 
can be granted without further on-site inspections. However, there was no commitment 
in this regard; 
China: Import restrictions on poultry due to HPAI – China reported that restrictions on 
DE, HU, Ukraine and Chile had been lifted, but  evaluations for NL,  FR and UK were 
still ongoing. Restrictions on EU Member States had been imposed in 2015; 
USA:  Import  restrictions  on  apples  and  pears     Still  no  publication  date  of  the  final 
rule; 
Russian  Federation: Import  restrictions  on  processed  fishery  products  from  Estonia  -
Russia confirmed that a date for a new audit had been agreed and reiterated (once again) 
their  commitment  to  address  the  EU  concern;  Import  restrictions  due  to Bluetongue  – 
Russia explained that new regulations were being put in place that should address the EU 
concerns. 
BSE:  The  EU  welcomed  the  progress  made  by  China,  Taiwan  and  Japan,  and  urged 
other  Members  (especially  South  Korea)  to  rapidly  lift  their  long-standing  and 
scientifically unjustified restrictions. 
Indonesia:  Lack  of  transparency  and  undue  delays  in  approval  procedures  for  animal 
products.
During  the  plenary,  the  EU  informed  the  Committee  that  the  Russian  restrictions  on  certain 
establishments  in  Germany  had  apparently  been  lifted,  and  undertook  to  formally  notify  the 
resolution to the Secretariat at the next Committee meeting, once the information had been officially 
confirmed.
The EU drew attention once again to the unjustified trade restrictions put in place by several WTO 
Members not respecting the OIE international standards on ASF and on HPAI.
II.
Trade concerns raised against the EU 
Colombia,  supported  by  several  Central  and  South  American  countries,  the  USA  and  Turkey, 
complained about the draft measure on Chorothalonil and the transitional periods granted to third 
countries for MRLs. The USA, supported by several members, including, Japan, India and Canada, 
reiterated  forcefully  their  concerns  on  the  EU  measures  lowering  the  existing  MRLs  for 
buprofezin, diflubenzuron, ethoxysulfuron, ioxynil, molinate, picoxystrobin and tepraloxydim, 
imizalil and glufosinate to the level of detection. Members questioned the risk assessment followed 
1 STC stands for Specific Trade Concern. 
2

by EFSA, complained about the short time granted to phase the measures in and argued that these 
discriminate between EU and third countries’ producers  and should take into account the specific 
climatic  situation  of  developing  countries  and  the  lack  of  readily  available  alternatives.  The  USA 
also argued that in a risk assessment the perception of uncertainty is not the same as identification of 
a  risk  and  added  that  measures  based  on  the  precautionary  principle  should  be  reviewed  in  due 
course and modified as necessary. Several members pointed out that the trade of certain agricultural 
commodity  such  as  bananas,  grapes  and  dried  fruit  would  be  hugely  affected,  thus  reducing  the 
livelihood of local populations. 
Once  again,  several  members  led  by  the  USA  raised  concerns  about  the  Endocrine  Disruptors 
(EDs) regulatory framework. It was argued that a hazard-based approach was inconsistent with the 
SPS Agreement and that lack of clarity and predictability in assessing MRLs for EDs already on the 
market and when assessing requests for import tolerances hinder trade and harm producers. Those 
Members  insisted  that  import  tolerances  should  be  granted  on  the  basis  of  clearly  established 
procedures and a full risk assessment, and that factors other than science (Other Legitimate Factors - 
OLFs) should not be taken into account in establishing MRLs for EDs and/or other plant protection 
products. Several members requested information about which OLF would be taken into account in 
the decision making process.  
The  USA,  supported  by  many  members,  strongly  criticised  the  EU  legislation  on  veterinary 
medicinal  products.  Members  questioned  the  extension  of  the  ban  on  antimicrobials  for  growth 
promotion  and  the  EU  list  of  antimicrobials  designated  for  human  use  to  third  country  operators. 
The  EU  measures  were  thought  to  compromise  international  efforts  to  fight  AMR,  including  the 
ongoing work in Codex and the OIE. The EU was requested to explain what criteria it would use 
when  setting  the  list  of  critically  important  antimicrobials  and  how  a  ban  on  the  use  of 
antimicrobials for growth promotion on third countries was in line with the SPS Agreement. 
China  requested  the  removal  of  residue  testing  requirements  for  the  remaining  products  in 
Decision 2002/994/EC and asked for the revision of the residue definition for folpet. 
Brazil  argued  that  the  EU  import  requirements  for  Salmonella  were  not  based  on  science  and 
claimed  that  they  had  been  introduced  as  a  consequence  of  their  incrased  quote  of  salted  poultry 
meat, following  a WTO dispute of 2002.  Brazil also considered that the EU discriminated within 
Brazil and other third countries with similar level of non-compliance.  
As  usual,  the  EU  delegation  defended  vigorously  the  legitimacy  of  the  EU  SPS  measures  under 
scrutiny, refuted any wrong or unsubstantiated allegations, and updated the Committee on the state 
of the play of the different files discussed. 
III.
Other issues 
A one-day thematic session on equivalence of SPS measures, systems and processes was held on 
the nineteen of March. This focused on members’ procedures and approaches toward equivalence 
and highlighted deep differences in its understanding and implementation. Canada as proponent of 
this  initiative  will  now  reflect  on  the  best  course  of  action.  The  thematic  session  on  FAW
highlighted  the  gravity  of  the  problem,  the  challenges  faced  by  members  and  the  different 
approaches  followed  to  tackle  the  pest.  Speakers  presented  a  wide  variety  of  tools  and  actions 
applicable at regional and/or national level. Biotechnology was seen as a winning strategy to address 
FAW  by  many  of  the  speakers.  The  EU  (P
( .
P   Miliona, , SA
S NT
N E 
E G1
G )
1  
) presented  the  EU  action, 
particularly regulatory measures, Technical Assistance and EU funded research. 
An informal meeting took place on the twentieth of March to discuss proposals for specific topics 
under  the  5th  Review  of  the  operation  and  implementation  of  the  SPS  Agreement.  Members  had 
submitted  proposals  on  equivalence,  regionalisation  (joint  EU/USA/Brazil),  the  importance  of 
science  and  risk  assessment  as  basis  of  sanitary  measures,  transparency,  third  party  certification, 
3

strengthening national SPS committees, pesticide MRLs and the involvement of Codex/OIE/IPPC in 
STCs. The EU raised concerns about the proposals on science and risk assessment (Brazil) and on 
the involvement of observer organisations in the discussions on STCs (South Africa). The proposal 
on  third  party  certification  from  Belize,  which  was  not  present  during  the  discussion,  was  not 
discussed. The rest of the proposals were again broadly supported.  
Under the information section of the agenda, the EU presented the state of play of implementation 
of three major regulations, notably Plant Health, Animal Health and Official Controls on the basis of 
documents circulated prior to the meeting. In addition, on the margins of the meeting, the EU  (B
( .
Loga
g r
a  an
a d
n  
d C. .Ma
M s
a sot
o , ,SA
S N
A TE,
E  G2
G )
2  
) gave a detailed presentation on the animal health law, which was 
followed with interest by several WTO Members
IV.
Bilateral meetings 
Fourteen  bilateral  meetings were  held  in  the  margins  of  the  SPS  Committee  namely  with 
Argentina, Brazil,  India, Indonesia, Israel, Japan, Malaysia, Philippines, Saudi Arabia, South 
Africa,  South  Korea,  Turkey,  USA  and  Viet  Nam.  A  meeting  requested  with  Thailand  was 
refused  on  the  grounds  of  an  overly  busy  schedule  of  Thailand.  Highlights  of  the  issues  (both 
offensive and defensive) discussed in these meetings include:  
ARGENTINA. The EU underlined the interest to make progress with issues such as born and raised 
clauses and regionalization wording in certificates. A study visit from ARG officials to the EU is 
being  prepared  to  support  a  better  understanding  of  the  EU  regionalization  policy.  Argentina 
reiterated  their  concerns  on  EDs  and  plant  protection  products.  In  particular,  they  mentioned  the 
transition  period  granted  to  third  countries  to  phase  measure  in  and  the  EU  guidelines  for 
establishing MRLs according to regulation 396/2005. 
BRAZIL: The EU requested an update of the SPS matrix, which was not provided since late 2017, 
and requested responses to several letters sent recently. In addition, the EU asked for feedback and 
reports  on  the  audits  performed  by  Brazil  in  Member  States  in  late  2018.  Brazil  provided  some 
information and flagged their offensive interests in relation to Salmonella criteria in poultry meat 
preparations.  
CHINA: China expressed the expectation that the EU will continue to support the request for Codex 
guidance on the definition of low risk foods that should be exempt from certification. China again 
confirmed that the certification requirements will not be implemented in October 2019. China also 
reiterated their concerns, notably on labelling of novel foods (zeaxanthin), and MRLs (tolfenpryrad 
in tea and lambda-cyhalothrin). 
INDIA took note of EU concerns related to leather, food additives and border controls for fruit and 
vegetables, but reacted by requesting further information rather than envisaging a resolution. India 
also reiterated its request or a transition period for implementing the EU MRLs for tricyclazole in 
basmati rice. 
INDONESIA:  Indonesia  had  delivered  some  written  feedback  on  Member  States  pending 
applications for animal products but no substantial progress is seen. The Indonesian delegation took 
note of EUs concern and promised to deliver the message to the capital and also promised support 
for future progress. 
ISRAEL: Given the imminent general elections,  Israel did not  give any hope that pending issues 
related to live animal transport can be resolved before the new government will have taken office. 
Even  then,  it  seems  likely  that  live  animal  imports  will  be  gradually  suspended  over  the  medium 
4

term. Israel claimed that intensive discussions are ongoing with the Chief Rabbinate to allow Kosher 
inspection of meat by rabbis residing in the EU Member States. Israel reiterated earlier comments 
on the new EU plant health legislation, especially on soil and potatoes. 
JAPAN:  It  was  agreed  to  continue  the  technical  work  towards  a  regionalisation  agreement  with 
Member  States  affected  by  African  swine  fever.  The  next  step  will  be  a  video  conference  with 
Belgium  before  the  end  of  March.  Japan  asked  some  information  on  the  new  EU  veterinary 
medicines legislation and on their applications for approval of exports of milk, eggs and poultry to 
the EU. 
MALAYSIA: The EU reiterated its concerns with recent country-wide ban on BE and PL due to 
African Swine Fever. The EU requested the lifting of the ban and offered to provide the technical 
services of Malaysia with any possible information request. The EU emphasized that any restrictive 
measures  must  be  science-based  and  take  the  least  trade  restrictive  approach.  Malaysia  provided 
some information on pending EU applications. 
PHILIPPINES and VIET NAM: EU discussed the lifting of import restrictions of Member States 
affected by African swine fever. In addition, pending market access applications were raised but no 
tangible progress was reported.  
SAUDI ARABIA. The EU referred to certain offensive interests such as regionalization on poultry, 
BSE rules, the discussion of certain harmonized certificates and certain conditions for stunning of 
poultry. It also requested an update on the export matrix. Saudi Arabia provided information on the 
state  of  play  and  committed  to  accept  a  videoconference  in  the  short  term  to  continue  a  close 
cooperation.
SOUTH  AFRICA:  EU  thanked  South  Africa  for  hosting  the  recent  seminar  on  avian  influenza 
control and regionalisation in January 2019 and inquired about the state of works on the re-opening 
of poultry imports from six Member States currently still suspended (BE, DE, FR, HU, NL, UK). 
According  to  South  Africa  evaluations  are  under  way  but  at  this  stage  it  is  premature  to  predict 
whether  on-site  inspections  will  be  necessary.  Ideally  this  would  not  be  the  case.  South  Africa 
informed that the FMD outbreaks are under control and vaccination is ongoing in the buffer zone. A 
report was sent to SANTE - South Africa is making an effort to keep EU informed. 
SOUTH KOREA. No progress in substance. The Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs held 
the view that questions related to regionalisation must be discussed bilaterally with Member States.  
MARA  saw  no  reason  to  share  their  questionnaire  that  Member  States  have  to  fill  with  the 
Commission.  However,  MARA  will  consider  a  proposal  of  COM  to  organise  a  regionalisation 
seminar in Seoul with interested Member States.  
TURKEY highlighted difficulties in export to the EU of fruit and vegetables due to the lowering of 
MRLs for several pesticides widely used in the country. Given the high quantities exported and their 
production processes, Turkey needs time to adapt agricultural practices and would appreciate greater 
predictability and transparency. Turkey wishes to have advanced information about upcoming EU 
regulatory  changes.  Turkey  requested  information  on  possible  legislative  developments  on 
ochratoxin, Pyrrolizidine alkaloids and chlorate. 
5


USA did not provide any information about the final rule for apples and pears, while complaining 
about  EU  plant  protection  products  framework  regulation  and  pesticides’  MRLs.  The  USA 
questioned  the  validity  of  EFSA  risk  assessment,  maintained  that  EFSA  request  for  data  are 
cumbersome  and unjustified and that EU MRLs should not be based on the precautionary principle. 
V.
Next meeting 
The  next  SPS  Committee  meeting  will  take  place  on  18-19  July  2019  and  will  be  preceded  by 
thematic sessions/workshops on the Fifth Review of the SPS Agreement and by informal meetings. 
***
6