This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'minutes of WTO SPS and TBT meetings'.



Ref. Ares(2018)5795024 - 13/11/2018
 
EUROPEAN COMMISSION 
DIRECTORATE-GENERAL FOR HEALTH AND FOOD SAFETY 
Directorate D – Food chain: stakeholder and international relations 
D2 – Multilateral International Relations 
DIRECTORATE-GENERAL FOR TRADE  
Directorate D – Sustainable Development, Bilateral Trade Relations, 
D3 – Agriculture, Fisheries, Sanitary and Phytosanitary Market Access, Biotechnology 
Brussels, 13.11.2018 
SANTE.D2/TRADE.D3 
 (2018) 6478438
Report of the 73rd WTO SPS Committee meeting (30 October-2 November 2018, Geneva) 
EU Delegation: 
DG
D  S
G AN
A TE: C. A
 C
lvar
va e
r z
e  
z Antoli
ol nez
ne , A. Ba
. B r
a na
r , M
na
. Cas
a te
t l
e lina 
na
DG
D  TR
G
AD
A E:
D  P. .Lu
L ciano,
a
 H. J
 H ooste
t ns, A
ns
. H
. aur
a um
ur
, W. Mai
a er
e  
r
SUMMARY
Once  again,  the  EU  policies  dominated  the  Committee’s  proceedings.  Two  thirds  of  the  formal 
meeting were devoted to discussing EU SPS measures. A total of 93 statements were made by more 
than thirty Delegations to question, directly or indirectly, EU policies and measures in several areas, 
notably:  
Endocrine disruptors (and cut-off criteria) (22 Delegations) 
MRLs of certain pesticides (Buprofezin, Diflubenzuron, Picoxystrobin) (16 Delegations) 
Limits of cadmium in cocoa and chocolate (14 Delegations) 
Precision Biotechnology (14 Delegations) 
Codex discussions on zilpaterol (9 Delegations) 
Veterinary Medicinal Products (7 Delegations) 
Glyphosate (6 Delegations) 
ECJ ruling on mutagenesis (3 Delegations) 
On the offensive front, the EU raised a new STC against Russia in relation to its import restriction 
on ruminants from areas affected by bluetongue. This new STC is in addition to those two that have 
been raised against Russia during the last years (ban on exports of fishery products from Estonia and 
on certain animal products from Germany). Furthermore, the EU took once again the opportunity to 
raise  a  STC  against  South  Africa  for  blocking  EU  exports  of  poultry  due  to  highly  pathogenic 
avian influenza (HPAI); one against the US for continuing to delay the exports of apples and pears 
from the EU; one against Indonesia for the lack of transparency and undue delays in their approval 
procedures  for  animal  products;  and  one  on  the  import  restrictions  due  to  BSE by  several  trade 
partners. 
In addition to the above, the EU, while sharing information about its control measures on African 
swine  fever  (ASF)  and  HPAI,  urged  trade  partners  to  respect  international  standards  and  WTO 
rules  -  especially  on  regionalization,  and  called  upon  them  to  lift  their  restrictive  and  unjustified  
measures accordingly. 
1

During  the  informal  meeting  13  proposals  put  forward  by  members  in  the  framework  of  the  5th
review of the operation and implementation of the SPS Agreement were discussed, among them 
the EU proposal on regionalisation.
In the margins of the Committee a half-day thematic session was conducted on equivalence, to be 
continued in March 2019. 
Thirteen bilateral meetings offered opportunities for the EU to push for key market access interests. 
***
DETAILED REPORT
EU offensive interests 
The EU raised seven offensive specific trade concerns (STCs): 
New: 
Russian  Federation:  bluetongue-related  import  restriction  on  ruminants  and  their 
genetic materials from areas affected by the disease. The Russian ban is not in line with 
OIE standards, and the agreed export health certificate is not respected; 
Previously raised:  
South Africa: import restrictions on poultry due to HPAI  South Africa informed that 
the applications filed by PL and ES were concluded but not the HU one; 
US: import restrictions on apples and pears   Still no publication date of the final rule; 
Russian Federation: import restrictions on certain animal products from Germany;  
Russian Federation: import restrictions on processed fishery products from Estonia; 
BSE:  The  EU  welcomed  the  progress  made  by  China,  Taiwan  and  Japan,  and  urged 
other Members (especially Sth Korea) to rapidly lift their long-standing and scientifically 
unjustified restrictions. 
Indonesia:  lack  of  transparency  and  undue  delays  in  approval  procedures  for  animal 
products
Under the agenda item on Monitoring of International Standards, the EU drew attention once again 
to the unjustified trade restrictions put in place by several WTO Members not respecting the OIE 
international  standards  on  ASF  and  on  HPAI.  The  EU  highlighted  the  effectiveness  of  the  EU 
system and the importance of international standards in ensuring that trade of safe commodities is 
not the cause of the spread of the diseases.
EU defensive interests 
Seven STCs were raised against the EU. 
Two  new  concerns  were  raised  namely  on  the  EU  measure  lowering  the  MRLs  for  buprofezin, 
diflubenzuron, ethoxysulfuron, ioxynil, molinate, picoxystrobin and tepraloxydim to the level 
of detection (by Colombia, India, supported by 14 other members – Argentina, Costa Rica, Brazil, 
Canada,  Chile,  the  USA,  Panama,  Paraguay,  Ecuador,  Nicaragua,  Honduras,  Peru,  Guatemala, 
Turkey) and on the recent ECJ opinion on organisms obtained by new mutagenesis techniques 
(by the USA, supported by Argentina and Paraguay). 
As regards MRLs, members questioned the risk assessment followed by EFSA, complained about 
the  short  time  granted  to  phase  the  measures  in  and  argued  that  the  measures  should  take  into 
account  the  specific  climatic  situation  of  developing  countries  and  the  lack  of  readily  available 
2

alternatives. Several members pointed out that the trade of certain products such as bananas would 
be unduly affected, thus reducing the livelihood of local populations. On the ECJ opinion, the EU 
was  requested  to  explain  the  scientific  basis  of  the  decision  and  to  provide  clarification  on  how 
proper  implementation  would  be  insured.  Legal  uncertainty  caused  to  trade  flows  was  also 
underlined.  The  US  took  the  opportunity  to  criticise  undue  delays  in  the  EU  GM  approval 
procedure. 
Once again members raised concerns about Endocrine Disruptors (EDs) (led by Argentina, the 
USA  China,  India  and  supported  by16  other  Members  –  New  Zealand,  Korea,  Colombia,  Chile, 
Costa  Rica,  Guatemala,  El  Salvador,  Brazil,  Canada,  Taiwan,  Panama,  Paraguay,  Peru,  Thailand, 
Australia,  Honduras  and  ECOWAS).  Members  argued  that  a  hazard-based  approach  was 
inconsistent  with  the SPS  Agreement  and  would  lead  to  the  banning  of  many  safe  substances  for 
which  favourable  risk  assessments  already  exist.  Several  countries  complained  about  the  lack  of 
predictability in establishing MRLs for EDs. Those Members insisted that import tolerances should 
be  granted  on  the  basis  of  a  full  risk  assessment  and  that  factors  other  than  science  (Other 
Legitimate Factors) should not be taken into account in establishing MRLs for EDs or other plant 
protection products.  
The  EU  legislation  on  veterinary  medicinal  products  was  again  raised  as  an  STC  by  Argentina 
and  the  USA  and  supported  by  5  other  countries  –  Colombia,  Canada,  Brazil,  Paraguay,  and 
Australia).  Members  expressed  strong  criticism  on  the  extension  of  the  ban  on  antimicrobials  for 
growth promotion and on the EU list of antimicrobials designated for human use to third country 
operators.  The  EU  measures  were  thought  to  compromise  international  efforts  to  fight  AMR, 
including the ongoing work in Codex and the OIE. The EU was requested to explain what criteria it 
would use for setting the list of critical antimicrobials and how the imposition of a ban on the use of 
antimicrobials for growth promotion on third countries would be in line with the SPS Agreement. 
EU maximum level of cadmium in foodstuffs (raised by Peru, Colombia, Cote D’Ivoire; supported 
by  11  other  Members  -  the  USA,  Venezuela,  Guatemala,  Trinidad  and  Tobago,  Costa  Rica,  El 
Salvador, Ecuador, Panama, Indonesia, Nicaragua, and Bolivia). Members questioned that the EU 
measure was based on updated scientific principles with respect to the risk to human health. The EU 
measures were cited not to be in line with the SPS Agreement as they were set without taking into 
account the objective of minimising trade impact. The EU was requested to postpone the entry into 
force  of  the  MLs  until  Codex  MLs  have  been  adopted  and  to  extend  the  transitional  period  until 
2022. Colombia criticised the EU in  general  for  not taking trade partners'  comments into account 
during the legislative process and urged the EU to notify drafts at an earlier stage. 
China  requested  the  removal  of  residue  testing  requirements  for  the  remaining  products  in 
Decision  2002/994/EC.  Once  again,  China  asked  for  the  revision  of  the  residue  definition  for 
folpet and welcomed recent developments. 
Under  a  different  agenda  item,  Argentina  presented  an  international  statement  on  agricultural 
applications of precision biotechnology (G/SPS/GEN/1658/Rev 2). 12 other Members (Uruguay, 
Brazil, Paraguay, Jordan, Dominican Republic, Canada, the USA, Australia, Guatemala, Vietnam, 
Honduras, Colombia and an observer organisation (ECOWAS) spoke emphasizing the critical role 
of  new  mutagenesis  techniques  in  agricultural  innovation  to  address  global  environmental 
challenges, food insecurity, antimicrobial resistance, animal and plant health outbreaks and animal 
welfare issues. Some members expressed their concerns about different domestic rules which create 
asymmetry in trade. The USA called for a constructive dialogue between trade partners. 
The US  criticised the initiative endorsed by the  Codex Alimentarius Commission in July 2018 to 
clarify  the  correlation  between  Codex  standards  and  the  WTO/SPS  Agreement  to  find  a 
solution to the stalled negotiations on the MRLs for zilpaterol. The US supported by Argentina and 
others,  considered  that  Codex  standards  should  be  based  exclusively  on  science  and  that  the 
3

relations between Codex standards and the WTO should be discussed in the WTO alone. Only did 
the EU defend Codex autonomy to decide their own agenda, cautioning again interferences from the 
SPS Committee into Codex work. 
Finally,  the  US,  supported  by  five  other  Delegations  raised  concerns  about  Members  adopting  or 
considering regulatory measures not based on science in relation to Glyphosate.
Other issues 
A half-day thematic session on equivalence of SPS measures, systems and processes was held on 
30 October. This focused on the relevant provisions of the SPS Agreement, on existing international 
standards  and  on  WTO  jurisprudence.  The  thematic  session  will  continue  with  sharing  Members’ 
experience on equivalence determinations in March 2019. 
An informal meeting took place on 31 October to discuss proposals for specific topics under the 5th
review  of  the  operation  and  implementation  of  the  SPS  Agreement.  Members  had  submitted 
proposals  on  issues  such  as  equivalence,  regionalisation,  the  importance  of  science  and  risk 
assessment  as  the  basis of  sanitary  measures,  transparency,  third  party  certification,  strengthening 
national SPS committees and pesticide MRLs. All proposals, but the one on third party certification 
from Belize, which was not present during the discussion, were broadly supported.  
Bilateral meetings
Twelve bilateral meetings were held in the margins of the SPS Committee namely with Argentina,
Brazil, Canada, China, Indonesia, Japan, Philippines, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, Thailand, 
UAE  and  US  (Sth  Africa  refused  the  EU’s  request  for  a  bilateral  meeting). The  EU  strongly 
encouraged all these countries to process market applications faster, follow international standards 
and provide real market openings. In the case of Argentina, Brazil, Canada, China, Philippines and 
USA, the EU also responded to their concerns about their exports to the EU. To different degrees, 
all the trading partners were open to the questions put forward by the EU and undertook to follow-
up. Highlights of the offensive issues discussed in these meetings include:  
Argentina raised its concerns in relation to the ECJ ruling. 
Brazil  provided  no  feedback  to  the  two  letters  sent  by  the  Commission  in  2018.  The 
Commission  reiterated  the  cooperative  approach  suggested  in  writing  by  the 
TRADE/SANTE/AGRI  Commissioners  to  start  solving  all  pending  issues  in  2019. On  the 
Salmonella  issue,  Brazil  threatened  again  with  launching  dispute  settlement  proceedings 
against  the  EU.  On  the  delistings,  Brazil's  request  is  to  re-establish  the  prelisting  and  the 
normal trade flows as soon as possible. 
Canada  undertook  to  looking  again  at  possible  options  to  import  tomatoes  from 
Italy. Canada reiterated its concerns on EDs, VMPs, the ECJ ruling and on the EU MRLs on 
picoxystrobin, underlining the need for setting import tolerance following a risk assessment. 
China  provided  a  constructive  message  on  regionalization  and  agreed  to  further  work 
together  on  the  certification  of  low  risk  products.  China  raised  its  concerns  on  the  EU 
measures regarding unauthorised genetically modified rice in rice products and asked the EU 
to  clarify  the  sampling  and  detection  method.  The  EU  MRLs  for  lambda-cyhalotrin  was 
considered  by  China  as  not  in  line  with  the  SPS  Agreement.  China  also  asked  for  an 
extension of the transition measures for tea leaves. 
Indonesia only promised to follow on the message conveyed by the EU in the STC. 
Japan confirmed that it continues to work on zoning for Avian Influenza. On VMPs Japan 
handed over a list of questions to SANTE. On the Japanese market access applications, they 
requested the EU to finalise all procedures and allow exports by February 2019. 
Philippines provided information about the imports of plants and committed to follow-up on 
the remaining issues (animals). The EU undertook to provide information on AFS in the EU. 
4


The Philippines requested information on their market access request for Calamansi and Pili 
Nut. The latter according to the Philippines should not be considered as a novel food. 
Saudi Arabia indicated that its BSE conditions to import beef may soon be relaxed, agreed 
to  start  a  dialogue  on  regionalization  but,  unfortunately,  did  not  provide  any  information 
about the possible lifting, derogation or postponement of the ban on the stunning of poultry.   
South  Korea  reported  that  the  conclusion  of  the  parliamentary  review  of  market  access 
application for beef from DK and NL is planned for the end of 2018.  
Thailand reported some progress on several (unfinished) applications for pork and apples.  
The United Arab Emirates undertook to report to its capital on EU's concerns expressed on 
the  new  legislation  on  Emirates  conformity  assessment  scheme  (ECAS)  for  certain  dairy 
products and fruit juices.  
The USA did not (yet) provide any indication about the date of publication of the final rule 
granting  market  access  from  8  Member  States  for  apples  and  pears  which,  after  the 
conclusion of the technical work in the US, is pending since 2016. The USA reiterated its 
concerns on EDs, VMPs, the ECJ ruling and on the EU MRLs on diphenylamine. 
Kenya  requested  a  bilateral  meeting  on  the  spot  requesting  assistance  from  the  EU  to 
prepare their dossier for momordica which is expected to be listed as a high-risk plant.  
Next meeting 
The next SPS Committee meeting will take place on 21-22 March 2019 and will be preceded by a 
thematic session on Equivalence and on Fall Armyworm (19 March) and an informal meeting (20 
March).
***
5