This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'New Pact on Migration and Asylum'.


 
  
 
 
 

Council of the 
 
 

 European Union 
   
 
Brussels, 25 November 2020 
(OR. en) 
    13261/20 
 
 
 
 
LIMITE 

 
JAI 1020 

MIGR 160 
 
 
RELEX 927 
COMIX 548 
ASILE 21 
 
NOTE 
From: 
Presidency 
To: 
Working Party on Integration, Migration and Expulsion (Expulsion) 
Subject: 
Presidency discussion paper: Requirements for functioning return 
sponsorships in practice 
 
 
With a view to the discussion at the upcoming informal VTC meeting of the IMEX (expulsion) 
Working Party on 30 November, delegations will find attached a Presidency Paper regarding the 
Requirements for functioning return sponsorships in practice.     
 
13261/20  
 
EG/eb 

 
JAI.1 
LIMITE 
EN 
 

 
ANNEX 
Presidency discussion paper: Requirements for functioning return sponsorships in practice 
On  23 September  2020,  the  European  Commission  presented  proposals  for  a  New  Pact  on 
Migration and Asylum. The reform proposals include elements on how to further develop the return 
procedure. A key element  is that of return sponsorship, as set  out in the draft of the Asylum and 
Migration Management Regulation (draft AMR).  
Return sponsorship is one of the solidarity contributions specified in Article 45 (1) (b) of the draft 
AMR.  In addition, it is also a measure to increase coordination and cooperation in the area of 
returns, especially to the benefit of Member States under migratory pressure according to Article 53 
draft AMR and of Member States in a situation of crisis according to Article 2(1) of the crisis 
Regulation.    
 
Article 55 draft AMR establishes that a Member State may support another Member State to return 
irregular staying third-country nationals. In such cases, the sponsoring Member State, acting in 
close coordination with the benefitting Member State, makes every effort to carry out the return of 
those irregular staying third-country nationals directly from the territory of the benefitting Member 
State.  According to the Commission’s statements in the IMEX Working Party on 26 October 2020, 
the benefitting Member State is responsible for taking appropriate measures to prevent persons 
required to return from absconding, in accordance with the Return Directive and the Asylum 
Procedures Regulation if applicable. If (and only if) the persons concerned do not return or are not 
removed within eight months (or within four months in crisis situations under Article 2 (7) of the 
draft regulation on crisis management), the benefitting Member State transfers those persons onto 
the territory of the sponsoring Member State to finalise the return procedures from there. For such 
situations, the sponsoring Member State will receive a contribution of 10,000 euros from the EU 
Budget as foreseen in Article 72 of draft AMR. All parties must take sufficient account of the best 
interests of the child, the family unit and the rights and special needs of vulnerable groups, and also 
take due account of the circumstances prevailing in the third country.   
 
 
 
13261/20  
 
EG/eb 

ANNEX 
JAI.1 
LIMITE 
EN 
 

 
Sponsoring Member States can help with the following return activities (among others): counselling 
on return and reintegration; support with voluntary return – including under return sponsorship 
priorities – and reintegration through national programmes and resources; dialogue and exchanges 
with relevant third countries for the purpose of facilitating readmission; support in verifying identity 
and obtaining valid travel documents; and practical arrangements for the return. Sponsorship 
measures are additional to the ones carried out by Frontex in accordance with its mandate and 
notably include measures that the Agency cannot implement.  
 
The Commission’s new Return Coordinator, Frontex and other Member States should support the 
sponsoring and benefitting Member States. During its presentation of return-related aspects of the 
Pact on Migration and Asylum at the IMEX Working Party on 26 October 2020, the Commission 
explained that, in addition to being a solidarity measure, return sponsorship aims at promoting 
cooperation among Member States in the area of return. It is up to the sponsoring and benefitting 
Member States to decide on the appropriate type of cooperation for the case in question, based on 
the actual needs of the benefitting Member State, which are also identified in the Report on 
Migration Pressure (article 51 draft AMR), and insofar as this assists with the effective return of the 
person from the territory of the benefitting Member State.  
 
The discussion of return sponsorship  in  the  IMEX Working Party showed that the Commission’s 
proposals  were  welcomed  by  several  Member  States  as  a  new  concept,  but  that  many  Member 
States  still  had  questions  regarding  the  practical  implementation.  Germany’s  Council  Presidency 
wants to take up this discussion with the Member States and explore shared approaches to making 
return  sponsorship  succeed  in  practice.  This  should  contribute  to  our  understanding  of  the  new 
provisions as well as allowing an initial exchange of ideas on the framework required for this novel 
instrument, and on possible contributions by the Member States and the role of the actors involved.  
In the German Presidency’s view, this raises some practical questions. First, there is the question of 
how contributions by sponsoring Member States can best be organised in the benefitting Member 
State (see 1 below). Then, there is the question of how sponsoring Member States and benefitting 
Member States can best coordinate their contributions with one another (see 2 below). Another key 
question is to determine which steps should be taken in the benefitting Member States to ensure that 
the eight-month deadline for returns can be met (see 3 below). And finally, it should be discussed 
which contribution can be made by the Commission – especially the new Return Coordinator and 
 
13261/20  
 
EG/eb 

ANNEX 
JAI.1 
LIMITE 
EN 
 

 
the High Level Network – and Frontex to ensure that return sponsorship succeeds in practice (see 4 
below). The Presidency wants to focus on these issues more closely.   
1. Potential support measures outlined in Article 55 (4) of the draft AMR  
a) Voluntary return (Article 55 (4) (a) and (b) of the draft AMR) 
In  the  area  of  voluntary  return,  it  would  be  conceivable,  for  instance,  that  a  sponsoring  Member 
State,  in  consultation  with  the  benefitting  Member  State,  might  use  a  mobile  return-counselling 
team  (with  interpreters).  This  team  would  advise  persons  (from  previously  agreed  countries  of 
origin) who are obliged to return about the option to do so voluntarily. An alternative would be to 
conduct  return  counselling  remotely  through  videoconferencing.  Benefits  provided  by  the 
sponsoring Member States in their national programmes could also be offered (with adjustments as 
necessary) to third-country nationals in the benefitting Member States. Another option is putting the 
national AVRR programme of the sponsoring Member State – as a whole - at disposal. 
Depending on the sponsoring Member State and country of destination, the AVRR support could 
range from payment of travel costs, financial assistance or benefits in kind before and after arrival, 
to payment of medical costs, or support with looking for accommodation and work, or with starting 
up  a  business  in  the  country  of  origin.  Persons  required  to  return  who  agree  to  do  so  voluntarily 
could  potentially  be  entitled  to  the  same  benefits  as  persons  returning  there  from  the  sponsoring 
Member State. Support could be offered in relation to one specific country of origin – e.g. one in 
which the sponsoring Member State has an especially successful reintegration programme  – or in 
relation to numerous countries of origin or particular regions. 
b) Supporting policy dialogue with third countries and verifying identity or obtaining travel 
documents (Article 55 (4) (c) and (d) of the draft AMR) 
In  order  to  persuade  third  countries  to  engage  in  dialogue  with  additional  Member  States,  as 
envisaged  by  the  return  sponsorship  policy,  it  will  be  important  to  involve  third  countries  at  all 
levels  of  return  sponsorship  policy.  A  sponsoring  Member  State  may  support  the  dialogue  and 
bilateral  negotiations  with  specific  third  countries  that  are  relevant  for  the  implementation  of 
sponsorship from the benefitting Member State, to facilitate the cooperation on identification and 
readmission  of  irregular  migrants.  The  support  that  may  be  provided  largely  depends  on  the 
Member  States  and  third  countries  concerned.  Joined  Member  States’  contacts  or  visits  at  senior 
 
13261/20  
 
EG/eb 

ANNEX 
JAI.1 
LIMITE 
EN 
 

 
level with relevant third countries may be organised and led by the sponsoring Member States for 
this purpose, for instance building on well-functioning bilateral agreements or arrangements. 
Member States that have a substantial and long-standing experience with a particular third country 
and have developed successful cooperation practices, can also share their contacts and knowledge, 
e.g.  on  procedures  in  that  third  country,  with  the  benefitting  Member  State.  However,  if  a 
sponsoring Member State has well established relations with a third country, care should be taken to 
ensure  that  those  relations  remain  in  place  and  are  not  compromised  by  taking  on  a  return 
sponsorship. To ensure that return sponsorship can work smoothly, it should be explored how the 
identification and re-documentation processes for an irregular migrant on the territory of a Member 
State can be carried out by different Member States, within the framework of existing agreements 
and  arrangements  and  how  the  issue  should  be  approached  with  each  third  country  concerned  in 
order not to jeopardise the established practices and current level of cooperation. Mandates for new 
negotiations of such instruments should factor in the return sponsorship operational requirements.  
In addition to supporting policy dialogue with third countries, sponsoring Member States could also 
help further with facilitating the verification of identity and the issuance of travel documents with 
the  authorities  of  third  countries.  The  sponsoring  Member  State  could,  for  example,  organise  an 
identification  mission  from  a  third  country,  with  the  support  of  Frontex  if  necessary,  in  the 
benefitting Member State, or help the benefitting Member State to engage in political consultations 
with  the  third  country.  Alternatively,  personnel  of  the  sponsoring  Member  State  could  be  sent  to 
help identify third-country nationals in the benefitting Member State. This of course depends on the 
third  country  being  prepared  to  engage  in  three-way  cooperation.  This  in  turn  should  be 
accompanied by the firm support of the Commission.  
Sponsoring Member States could also help by checking the authenticity of documents, or teaching 
benefitting Member States how to do so themselves. 
When  identification  based  on  documentary  evidence  (copies  of  passports,  fingerprints)  can  be 
carried  out  directly  by  the  third  country  central  authorities,  the  sponsoring  Member  States  can 
support the sponsored Member States in preparing and presenting the evidence through established 
channels,  including  via  the  sponsored  Member  State  central  authorities,  ILOs  or  diplomatic 
representation,  and  ensure  the  follow  up  to  obtain  the  confirmation  of  identity.  In  this  regard,  it 
could also be explored how the sponsoring Member State may utilize digital solutions it has access 
to, such as the readmission case management systems in use for some countries of origin. 
 
13261/20  
 
EG/eb 

ANNEX 
JAI.1 
LIMITE 
EN 
 

 
In  practice,  when  it  comes  to  support in  verifying  the  identity  of  third-country  nationals  who  are 
required  to  return,  a  number  of  questions  are  likely  to  require  clarification  –  including  legal 
questions: in  order for the identity  of such persons to  be verified, the authorities must be able to 
ensure that those persons attend interviews (which means the benefitting Member State still carries 
the risk of such persons absconding); furthermore, regarding documentary evidence, access to the 
relevant  records  and/or  the  relevant  return  electronic  case  management  system  of  the  benefitting 
Member State is required in order to support identification effectively. 
c) Help with arranging the enforcement of returns (Article 55 (4) (e) of the draft AMR) 
Various kinds of support are also conceivable when it comes to enforcing returns from the territory 
of  a  benefitting  Member  State.  For  instance,  the  sponsoring  Member  States  could  help  organise 
return operations, for instance by taking the role of organising Member State for a (joint) Frontex 
return  operation.  Further  support  could  be  provided  by  additional  personnel  from  the  sponsoring 
Member  State,  e.g.  doctors  and  interpreters,  notably  when  and  if  these  are  not  available  through 
Frontex.  In  the  case  of  unescorted  returns,  logistical  support  can  be  provided  by  the  sponsoring 
Member State, for instance by liaising with Frontex for the organisation of those flights or, where 
necessary, by providing a financial contribution.  
 
2. Types of cooperation between sponsoring Member States and benefitting Member States 
Apart from the question of which types of support a sponsoring Member State can provide, another 
key  question  is  how  best  to  coordinate  such  measures  with  benefitting  Member  States  to  ensure 
effective cooperation.  
One  type  of  cooperation  framework  between  sponsoring  and  benefitting  Member  States  is  the 
bilateral agreement. Some Member States at the IMEX Working Party on 26 October 2020 pointed 
out that it might be worth including a provision on types of cooperation directly in the draft AMR; 
article  42  draft  AMR  provides  for  the  possibility  of  concluding  administrative  arrangements, 
including in relation to solidarity contributions. 
In its report on migratory pressure, the Commission identifies, based on Article 51 (3) of the draft 
AMR, the needs of Member States under migratory pressure. It also identifies appropriate measures 
that could be taken by contributing Member States. In the Solidarity Response Plan referred to in 
Article 52 of the draft AMR, contributing Member States that are also potential sponsoring Member 
 
13261/20  
 
EG/eb 

ANNEX 
JAI.1 
LIMITE 
EN 
 

 
States could also specify which type of support they want to provide (e.g. return sponsorship) and 
the nationalities that would be covered.  
In addition, the needs of the benefitting Member States and potential offers of help from sponsoring 
Member States could be regularly recorded and mapped at an early stage. Member States willing to 
act as sponsors could submit an outline of what they may offer (showing, for instance, which third 
countries they have good relations with, which third countries’ embassies or consulates they have in 
their country, or what kind of tools they have at their disposal). The Commission, and particularly 
the Return Coordinator, will play a crucial intermediary role in this context by matching supply and 
demand. Frontex should support this activity.  
Another  form  of  cooperation  could  be  joint  offers  of  sponsorship  from  several  Member  States 
acting together as long as it is clear how the obligation of each of these Member States translates 
into the solidarity mechanism. 
In the field of capacity building measures, Member States could also offer cooperation in the form 
of twinning projects, for instance, in which liaison officers or advisors are sent on secondment from 
sponsoring Member States to work in benefitting Member States. 
 
3. Steps to be taken in the benefitting Member State 
From  the  perspective  of  the  sponsoring  Member  State,  it  is  important  that  conditions  in  the 
benefitting Member State are such that return sponsorship can generally be successful within eight 
months.  Key  to  this  is  that  the  sponsoring  and  benefitting  Member  States  cooperate  as  early  as 
possible  and  share  information  closely,  with  the  support  of  the  Commission  and  the  Return 
Coordinator. For Member States to accept or be willing to offer return sponsorship, it is important 
that the benefitting Member State quickly takes all the necessary steps and measures for which it is 
responsible.  
For instance, the sponsoring Member State needs to know as early as possible the identity of third-
country  nationals  for  whom  the  sponsorship  is  required.  The  Commission’s  legislative  acts 
therefore provide for early registration and/or screening in accordance with the proposed Screening 
Regulation  and  amended  EURODAC  Regulation,  including  the  registration  of  third-country 
nationals in EURODAC. The collection of necessary data and evidence is also extremely important, 
 
13261/20  
 
EG/eb 

ANNEX 
JAI.1 
LIMITE 
EN 
 

 
as is the documentation and secure archiving of relevant carried documents and data storage media, 
as required by the legal provisions, insofar as this is necessary for verifying identity.  
Applications  to  be  made  in  accordance  with  readmission  agreements  or  arrangements  should  be 
submitted by the benefitting Member State within the time limit, without prejudice to the measures 
possibly taken by the sponsoring Member State. The benefitting Member State should also ensure, 
within the framework of its national law and in accordance with the relevant EU legal provisions, 
that  persons  required  to  return  do  not  abscond  and  remain  available  for  return.  In  this  context, 
according to  the Commission’s statements in  the  IMEX Working Party on 26 October 2020, it is 
still necessary to clearly define the consequences that absconding have on sponsorship, notably on 
the calculation of the 8-month period.   
Within  the  framework  of  their  cooperation,  the  sponsoring  Member  State  and  the  benefitting 
Member State should agree  at  an early stage on  how language and translation issues are handled 
among  the  Member  States  and  what  access  or  powers  are  to  be  granted  in  establishments  on  the 
territory of the benefitting Member State.  
 
4. Role of the Commission and the new Return Coordinator, and role of Frontex 
The European Commission, the new Return Coordinator and the High Level Network for Return all 
play  a  key  role  in  supporting,  managing  and  coordinating  Member  States’  return  sponsorship 
activities. In this context, the Return Coordinator could, for example, provide contacts, coordinate 
the  supply  and  demand  of  Member  States  and  the  support  of  Frontex,  and  potentially  share  best 
practice examples (e.g. drawing up a model agreement or SOP between sponsoring and benefitting 
Member States). The Return Coordinator’s work could also feed into the Commission’s stepped up 
engagement with partner countries.  
It is also important for the Commission to take into account any agreements reached between 
Member States and third countries at national and European level, to identify possible gaps with 
regard to certain third countries, to make recommendations on selection and procedures for 
selecting appropriate categories of people and, where necessary, to coordinate the approaches of 
Member States.  
 
 
13261/20  
 
EG/eb 

ANNEX 
JAI.1 
LIMITE 
EN 
 

 
In order to improve cooperation with third countries, all relevant and available instruments should 
be  used  in  a  situation-appropriate  manner  and  tailored  to  the  relevant  third  country,  so  to  ensure 
that, generally speaking, return can be carried out within the eight-month period. The Commission’s 
report on cooperation with third countries in the area of return, pursuant to Article 25a of the Visa 
Code, is an important first step in this regard. Furthermore, Article 7 of the draft AMR will work 
together with the comprehensive coordination mechanism adopted by the COREPER in June 2020. 
Frontex  could  also  provide  complementary  support  for  return  sponsorship  within  the  scope  of  its 
mandate, e.g. by helping Member States to share information with one another; in this context, the 
IRMA information exchange platform could be helpful.  
Germany’s Council Presidency invites the European Commission and Frontex to explain in greater 
detail what role they can play in supporting return sponsorship.  
 
5. Questions to the Member States 
In view of the above, we invite the delegations to express their opinion on the following questions:  
(a) What specific contributions can sponsoring Member States usefully make in terms of the support 
measures listed in Article 55 of the draft AMR? What contributions can be made remotely and what 
kind of support can be given on the ground? 
(b) How can sponsoring Member States and benefitting Member States cooperate in practical terms, 
and how can they best coordinate their respective contributions to ensure effective returns? 
(c)  What  steps  and  measures  should  benefitting  Member  States  take  so  that  sponsoring  Member 
States can facilitate successful returns within the eight-month period? 
d) What contributions can the Commission, in particular the new Return Coordinator, and Frontex 
make to ensure that return sponsorship works in practice?  
 
 
 
13261/20  
 
EG/eb 

ANNEX 
JAI.1 
LIMITE 
EN