Ceci est une version HTML d'une pièce jointe de la demande d'accès à l'information 'Meeting - 7th May 2020 between Gaelle Garnier and Nestlé S.A. (Nestlé (SIX: NESN), Mondelez Europe GmbH (MDLZ), FoodDrinkEurope (FoodDrinkEurope)'.



Ref. Ares(2021)3604085 - 01/06/2021
 
DG GROW  
Teleconference with FoodDrinkEurope 
  
Brussels, 27.04.2020, 14:00 
(CAB BRETON/106) 
 
BRIEFING NOTE (Commission Internal) 
 
Scene setter/Context of the meeting:
  
 
On 27 April you will have a phone call with the 
 of FoodDrinkEurope 
(FDE): 

  and 
  -  the  European  Food  and  Drink 
Industry  Association.   
  will  also  have  a  phone  call  with  VP  Timmermans  on 
sustainable food chains on the same day.   
 
 
The  food  and  drink  industry  is  the  biggest  manufacturing  sector  in  Europe  in  terms  of 
employment and added value, including 290 000 companies, 99% of which are SMEs.  
 
Food  processors  have  been  impacted  by  the  COVID-19  crisis  in  different  ways:  issues  at 
border  crossings,  availability  of  workers  in  factories  (including  cross-border  and  seasonal 
workforce), need for PPE in factories, increased costs (transport, logistics, hygiene, etc.) and 
(in many cases) reduced demand (depending on the outlet of their products). Producers of 
drinks, products destined mostly to HORECA and speciality foods have seen a sharp drop in 
demand. As big exporters, food operators have also seen changes related to external trade. 
They  would  like  all  Member  States  to  provide  priority  treatment  for  food  production, 
recognizing the sector as ‘essential’.  
 
In the  meantime,  FDE has  also  been  active  in  providing  input  to the  Farm  to  Fork  Strategy 
about their industry’s contribution and concerns.  
 
Objective of the meeting:  
 
 
The objective of the meeting is to exchange views on the most pressing problems of the food 
sector today.  
 
The main issues expected to be raised by FDE are: the impact of COVID-19 on the functioning 
of  the  food  supply  chain  and  related  requests  for  support  by  the  food  industry;  the 
contribution of the sector to the Farm to Fork strategy; trade issues as well as research and 
innovation in food.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 




for the facilitation of circulation of goods, services and persons (e.g. service providers) across 
EU countries? 

-  How do you expect your sector to change and adapt in a post-COVID world? What would be 
your ‘exit strategy’? 
 
On sustainable food supply chains and the up-coming Farm to Fork Strategy:  
 

  I welcome the commitment of your sector to shift to more sustainable production practices, 
including sustainable sourcing of raw materials,  recycling and reuse of packaging. This is in 
line  with  the  objectives  of  the  Farm  to  Fork  Strategy,  under  preparation.  All  actors  in  the 
food chain need to sustainable production also as a competitiveness opportunity.  
  The strategy will of course be in line with other Commission initiatives – the new Industrial 
and SME strategies, the Circular Economy Action Plan etc.  
  We will make sure that the strategy is comprehensive and fair, that it is transformational but 
also  empowering  for  producers  and  especially  that  SMEs  get  the  necessary  support  in  the 
transition.  
 
Possible questions to the interlocutor:  
 
-  What  main  actions  under the  Farm  to  Fork  Strategy  (including  regulatory  or not) would  be 
supportive for the sustainability objectives of your sector? 
-  What are the top three issues for you when it comes to sustainability of food processing? 
 
 
 
 
 
Defensives / Q&A 
 
Question:  Can  the  Commission  help  in  ensuring  that  Member  States  recognize  all  food 
products  and  inputs  for  their  production  (including  packaging)  as  ‘essential’  during  the 
corona crisis? 
 
Answer
:  The  food  industry  is  considered  as  essential  by  the  Member  States,  even  if  the 
practicalities  may  vary.  We  support  actions  to  provide  childcare  services  for  food  industry 
workers.  When  it  comes  to  the  cross-border  movement  of  goods,  the  Green  Lanes  have 
been  recommended  for  all  goods,  especially  (but  not  limited  to)  the  essential  ones.  We 
remain eager to receive information on problems in free movement to evaluate further the 
situation.  
 
 
Question:  We  appreciate  the  COM  Guidelines  on  free  movement  of  workers.  It  would  be 
useful if the Commission could suggest a common certificate to facilitate the free movement 
of workers, including in the food sector. Is the Commission considering this? 
 
Answer: My services have informed the Directorate General for Employment on this option.  
 

Question:  Will  the  EIB  also  provide  a  financial  support  to  operators  in  the  food  supply 
chain? How will SMEs be supported? 
 
Answer
: The EIB Group will rapidly mobilise up to EUR 40 billion to fight the crisis caused by 
Covid-19. Amongst them, EUR 10 billion will be dedicated liquidity lines to banks to ensure 
additional working capital support for SMEs and mid-caps. I know that there are many SMEs 
in  the  food  sector;  thank  you  for  providing  them  with  the  necessary  information  on  EU 
support.  
 
Question: What long-term  measures  are  planned by the  Commission  to  support  economic 
recovery after the end of the crisis? 
 
Answer:  
The  Commission  work  on  economic  support  measures  is  on-going.  Several 
measures are under reflection but have to be confirmed. The Commission has put forward a 
European  roadmap  to  phase-out  the  containment  measures  due  to  the  coronavirus 
outbreak, to find the economic and social balance, towards a post-COVID world. A coherent 
and co-ordinated response would be key.  
 
Question:
  Will  the  Commission  adjust  regulatory  deadlines  for  the  acts  that  will  be 
applicable or will enter into force in the coming months?  
 
Answer: 
I have instructed my services to analyse all the upcoming regulatory deadlines and 
of their adequacy under the current circumstances, based on Commission competence. Your 
input is of course appreciated in this respect. 
 
Question: When will the Farm to Fork strategy be adopted, given the circumstances? 
 
Answer: 
All I can say for now is that the  adoption is planned in the second quarter of 2020 
and  my  services are following the process  with the Directorates for  Health, Agriculture  etc. 
We  are  living  in  exceptional  circumstances;  yet  the  need  for  the  COVID-19  emergency 
response should, in no way, put aside other Commission priorities such as the Green Deal.  
 
The Green Deal mentions that the Farm to Fork Strategy will cover all the stages of the food 
value chain. What action does the Commission foresee for operators ‘between the farm and 
the fork’: the food and drink industry, retail etc.? 
 
Answer
:  The  Commission  is  in  the  process  of  designing  the  set  of  actions  to  achieve  the 
objective of the Farm to Fork Strategy. The food and drink industry has a key role in shaping 
the footprint of the whole value chain and we will work in this direction – collaboration in 
the chain will be vital. The Commission will work closely with stakeholders in designing and 
implementing  the  actions  under  the  strategy.  We  will  consider  the  impact,  particularly  on 
small companies.  
 
 
 
 
 


Question: How will the Commission support SMEs in the food sector in the transition? 
 
Answer: Actions to support SMEs will be vital (as 99% of food processors are SMEs). Advisory 
services  on  sustainability  (as  part  of  the  Enterprise  Europe  Network)  and  creating  SME 
guidance  will  be  one  element.  This  and  other  supporting  actions  are  proposed  under  the 
new  SME  strategy,  including  improved  access  to  finance.  Another  important  aspect  is  to 
streamline  digital  solutions  that  accompany  sustainability  performance,  which  can  be 
specific  for  the  food  sector.  The  Sustainable  Europe  Investment  Plan  and  Just  Transition 
Mechanisms will provide sustainability incentives, including for SMEs.  
 
Question:  Will  there  be  space  for  industry-led  initiatives  with  all  the  new  Commission 
strategies (Farm to Fork, Industrial strategy etc.)?  
 
Answer
:  The  new  strategies  are  meant  to  create  a  viable  framework,  predictability  and  a 
harmonised  approach  where  needed  –  to  meet  the  double  challenge  of  a  digital  and 
sustainability transition. Clearly, industry-led initiatives will continue to play a very important 
role  in  advancing  on  environmental  or  health-related  issues,  including  on  food.  Of  course, 
they need to be credible, ambitious and in line with the objectives, that Europe has set. The 
Farm to Fork Strategy will build on both regulatory and non-regulatory measures. 
 
Question: How about research and innovation in the food sector?  
 
Answer
: Research and innovation are indeed a key driver for sustainable food production and 
I see  a lot  of potential there. The food area  will be duly  covered under the Horizon  Europe 
programme,  which  will  follow  a  food  system  approach.  Food  companies  also  have  a  lot  to 
contribute to the innovation effort.  
 
Question: Our sector is exporting worldwide, thanks to the reputation of European food for 
quality and safety. How will the Commission ensure that actions under the Farm to Fork are 
aligned with other policies such as trade, in order not to jeopardise our competitiveness?  
 
Answer: I will work with my fellow Commissioners on external action and trade on the issue 
of  a  level-playing  field.  The  EU  has  an  unmatched  experience  in  promoting  sustainable 
standards,  including  in  food,  in  international  fora.  We  are  open  to  a  partnership  approach 
with  partner  countries  to  ensure  that  the  European  transition  leads  also  to  a  global  shift 
towards more sustainable food production. I already mentioned the need to turn European 
products into the global standard for sustainability and make this our comparative advantage, 
even if it may not be an easy road.  
 
Question: What are the European Commission plans on harmonizing front-of-pack nutrition 
labelling?
  While  we can benefit from harmonization, making front-of-pack  nutritional  labels 
obligatory  can  cause  unnecessary  costs,  overwhelming  information  and  may  not  necessarily 
meet the sustainability objective.
  
Answer:  The  Commission  will  work  towards  a  harmonized  solution  that  meets  consumer 
expectations  on  nutritional  information  and  avoids  barriers  in  the  Single  Market,  without 
imposing  unnecessary  burden,  especially  for  SMEs.  Healthy  diet  is  important  for  the 
sustainable food system. 



MS safety measures (HU, RO, BG) forcing drivers to enter into 14 days quarantine caused 
disruption. 
  Issues with frontier and seasonal workers – quarantine rules and restrictions have had a 
serious impact on cross-border workers in the food industry. Restrictions on agricultural 
seasonal  workers  are  problematic  for  farming  and  have  a  potential  impact  for  raw 
material  supply  for  the  food  industry:  e.g:  CZ  has  banned  "cross-border  commuting", 
ignoring  the  guidelines  for  border  management  and  reportedly  affecting  50.000  Czech 
workers commuting daily to neighbouring countries.  
  Restrictive measures taken by MS – RO announced that the export of the wheat, barley, 
oats,  maize,  soybeans,  flour,  seed  oil,  sugar,  biscuits,  cakes  and  everything  related  to 
bakery is suspended (yet, intra-EU acquisition of agricultural products can be done only if 
a  member  country  proves  that  the  purchased  products  are  intended  for  own  or 
community  consumption,  and  not  for  export).  HR  is  considering  measures  to  limit 
exports or set prices in case of need; BG favouring local products; PL intervention with 
local producers. 
  Impossibility to meet some new regulatory requirements – e.g. Due to the impact of the 
current crisis, some companies are reporting difficulties in being able to meet the date of 
1  April,  date  of  application  of  the  Regulation  (EU)  2018/775  regarding  the  rules  for 
indicating  the  country  of  origin  or  place  of  provenance  of  the  primary  ingredient  of  a 
food. 
  Other impact on business – impacts on reduced business development, sales and slow 
deliveries, requests for providing (virus free) certifications. 
  Impact on business and trade with countries outside the EU – Disruption of supply of raw 
materials from outside the EU. Issues to supply raw materials from Asia, TR; difficulties 
and  delays  in  getting  shipping  containers;  the  prices  of  containers  have  risen;  some 
reports  of  excessive  increases  in  freight  costs  and  a  maximum  validity  of  2  weeks  for 
quotation. 
 
The main requests of the food industry, in relation to the COVID-19 response 
 
• Recognise the entire food chain as essential: 
Define  the  notion  of  “essential  goods  such  as  food  supplies”  to  include  all  food  and  drink 
products, food ingredients, packaging and packaging material, animal feed and pet food.  
The food industry is largely considered as essential/vital across most EU Member States, but 
the meaning may vary in practical terms and by national context.  
• Unblock transport bottlenecks: 
  Ensure that the guidelines are effectively implemented by the Member States.   
  Implement priority green lanes for food lorries and wave weekend bans 
  Harmonise border-crossing protocols 
  Consider measures to re-distribute food that cannot reach its market 
  set up a ‘hot-desk’ which operators could contact in the event barriers arise  
• Support the food sector workforce: 
  Harmonized protocols for food sector workers to work safely 
  Advise MS to provide childcare for critical professions within the food industry 
• Ensure free movement of workers for retail and food production:  
  Proper implementation of the EU Guidelines on mobility of workers, including for 
retail and wholesale workers as well as seasonal workers. 

  Design an EU model of certificate for essential cross-border workers, such as in 
the food sector (some MS have their own) 
  Support struggling businesses 
  Develop emergency measures for the food sector (esp. where demand has gone 
down, to meet new costs to continue functioning) 
• Facilitate global trade: 
  Hold bi-lateral talks with trade partners. 
 
The Farm to Fork Strategy  
 
The  ‘Farm  to  Fork’  Strategy  (part  of  the  Green  Deal)  aims  to  foster  the  green  and  fair 
transition of the food system and making European food a global standard for sustainability. 
Besides  objectives  for  primary  food  production,  it  notes  the  importance  of  circularity  and 
reducing  the  impact  of  processors,  retailers  and  all  stages  of  the  food  supply  chain.  The 
strategy is to be adopted by the Commission in the second quarter of 2020 (planned 29th of 
April, date not confirmed) and will be accompanied by a broad stakeholder debate. The draft 
Outline  Paper  (narrative)  of  the  strategy  and  an  Action  plan  with  concrete  objectives  have 
now undergone an inter-service consultation. The lead DGs are SANTE, AGRI and MARE (SG 
as  co-ordinator).  GROW,  ENV,  CLIMA,  JRC  and  others  provide  regular  input.  A  public 
consultation was held 17 February 2020 - 16 March 2020 with over 80 responses. 
 
The Commission plans (as part of the strategy) to work with businesses in the supply chain 
and  co-design  a  Code  for  responsible  business  and  marketing  practices  in  the  food  supply 
chain (building on existing work of the Commission, international guidelines and accounting 
for  the  specificities  of  the  food  sector).  In  the  long  term,  rules  on  sustainable  corporate 
governance can be considered.  
 
Other (possible) actions in the draft Action plan relevant for food processing are: promoting 
and  scaling  circular  business  models,  revising  marketing  standards,  looking  into  the 
legislation  on  geographical  indications  to  assess  their  environmental  impact,  reducing 
plastics  packaging  (including  single  use  plastics  in  food  service),  revise  the  food  contact 
materials legislation etc.  
 
Actions to support SMEs will be vital (99% of food processors and many retailers are SMEs). 
Advisory  services  on  sustainability  as  part  of  the  Enterprise  Europe  Network  (proposed 
under  the  new  SME  strategy)  are  a  good  starting  point.  Another  key  idea  is  to  streamline 
digital  solutions  that  accompany  sustainability  performance,  specific  for  the  food  sector. 
There is a draft proposal to explore an EU sustainability label. The initiatives on labelling (in 
particular the sustainable food logo) need to bear in mind the costs for SMEs.  
 
The final list of actions is to be finalised following the Inter-Service Consultation 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 

Main requests of FoodDrinkEurope in relation to Farm to Fork (F2F) 
 
  Coherence  -  align  objectives,  targets  and  timelines  between  various  initiatives;  a 
common understanding about what sustainable food systems are 
  A Strong Single Market -  Ex ante Single Market test for F2F proposals 
  Co-ordination with Member States - set up a high level dialogue Platform  
  Co-ownership  -  all  actors  to  ‘co-own’  and  identify  co-benefits;  A  positive  narrative  to 
ensure ‘buy-in’ from operators 
  Assess  the  impact  of  Retail  Alliances  on  food  systems  transformation  (to  be  done  by 
competition authorities) as the lowest price does not allow for innovation 
  Science and evidence based targets; Evaluation and holistic impact assessments 
  No compromise on food safety (e.g. in relation to packaging) 
  Concrete incentives for innovation - R&I funding for sustainable food systems 
  Create sustainable and inclusive growths and jobs (competitiveness) 
  Help SMEs to achieve transition through an enabling framework. 
  Support  the  quest  for  alternatives  to  chemical  pesticides  and  fertilisers  –  without 
jeopardising yields. 
  Sustainable  sourcing:  supported  by  Sustainable  EU  trade  policy,  harmonised  due 
diligence requirements and better reliability of forest-related certification schemes 
  Necessity for a consistent approach throughout the Green Deal on Sustainable packaging 
  Harmonise the policy framework for standardised product environmental information  
  Provision of info to consumers: voluntary with harmonised mandatory conditions 
  On  Consumer  information  -  Avoid  fragmentation  of  Single  Market;  Push  back  against 
unjustified/harmful national initiatives; Digital consumer information; 
  On public procurement (Review methodology  -> Green Public Procurement criteria for 
food) 
  New ambitious trade policy (Coherence: EU trade policy/CAP/ /regulatory requirements) 
 
Front-of-pack nutritional labelling 
 
Nutritional  labelling  of  food  falls  under  the  primary  responsibility  of  Commissioner 
Kyriakides.  EU  law  allows  voluntary  front-of-pack  nutritional  information  using  graphical 
forms or symbols in addition to words or numbers. Such additional information should not 
create obstacles to the free movement of goods. 
 
The  Commission  had  to  adopt,  by  2017,  a  Report  on  the  use  of  front-of-pack  nutritional 
labelling.  The  adoption  was  first  delayed  then  suspended  in  the  summer  of  2019  (in 
preparation of the appointment of the new Commission). One of the actions 
 
 in the draft, Farm to Fork Strategy under the section on empowering consumers is to 
‘harmonise front-of-pack  nutrition labelling  and  explore the  options to make  it  obligatory’. 
This  is  however  still  a  draft  proposal  to  be  discussed  among  services. 
 
 
 
 
From a Single Market point of view, the proliferation of different initiatives on front-of-pack 
labelling in different Member States risks causing fragmentation. In 2017, France developed 
‘Nutri-score’  as  a  voluntary  front-of-pack  nutrition  logo  to  be  displayed  on  food  products. 

Belgium,  Spain  and  Germany  later  recommended  Nutri-Score  to  food  business  operators; 
other  member  States  e.g.  the  Netherlands  and  Portugal  are  also  supporting  this  position. 
Other  voluntary  schemes  in  use  around  Europe  include  the  Nordic  Keyhole,  the  UK  Traffic 
Lights labels and the “Nutrinform battery” recently notified by Italy.