Dear Joint Research Centre,

Under the right of access to documents in the EU treaties, as developed in Regulation 1049/2001, I am requesting documents which contain the following information:

Classification of Battery Energy Storage Systems.

In Ireland they appear to be classed as non-generational.

In the UK they are classed as electricity generators.

Does the EU have a directive or a view as to how they should be classified?

Yours faithfully,

Ed Crawford

MASERA Marcelo, Centre commun de recherche

1 Attachment

Dear Mr. Crawford,

 

We understand that your question refers to the treatment of storage
systems (including batteries) in the regulation of energy markets/systems.

 

On this, there is no "classification" or set of classification rules
impossed by the EU. The detailed regulation of energy markets is a
national issue. Hence, such questions should be addressed to the national
energy regulators.

 

We are the JRC do not carry out work on the topic as it has not been of
immediate relevance for European policies.

 

The general rules relevant to this topic are set in the [1]Directive on
common rules for the internal market for electricity (EU) 2019/944, but
–as you might know- it only sets basic rules in line with previous
legislation, such as the following statements from the provisions:

 

(62) System operators should not own, develop, manage or operate energy
storage facilities. In the new electricity market design, energy storage
services should be market-based and competitive. Consequently,
cross-subsidisation between energy storage and the regulated functions of
distribution or transmission should be avoided. Such restrictions on the
ownership of energy storage facilities is to prevent distortion of
competition, to eliminate the risk of discrimination, to ensure fair
access to energy storage services to all market participants and to foster
the effective and efficient use of energy storage facilities, beyond the
operation of the distribution or transmission system. That requirement
should be interpreted and applied in accordance with the rights and
principles established under the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the
European Union (the ‘Charter’), in particular the freedom to conduct a
business and the right to property guaranteed by Articles 16 and 17 of the
Charter.

(63) Where energy storage facilities are fully integrated network
components that are not used for balancing or for congestion management,
they should not, subject to approval by the regulatory authority, be
required to comply with the same strict limitations for system operators
to own, develop, manage or operate those facilities. Such fully integrated
network components can include energy storage facilities such as
capacitors or flywheels which provide important services for network
security and reliability, and contribute to the synchronisation of
different parts of the system.

 

(64) With the objective of progress towards a completely decarbonised
electricity sector that is fully free of emissions, it is necessary to
make progress in seasonal energy storage. Such energy storage is an
element that would serve as a tool for the operation of the electricity
system to allow for short-term and seasonal adjustment, in order to cope
with variability in the production of electricity from renewable sources
and the associated contingencies in those horizons.

 

Then, other elements of interest in that Directive are given in the
definitions:

 

(51) ‘fully integrated network components’ means network components that
are integrated in the transmission or distribution system, including
storage facilities, and that are used for the sole purpose of ensuring a
secure and reliable operation of the transmission or distribution system,
and not for balancing or congestion management;

 

And further down in the Directive there are generic references to storage
systems in Chapter IV DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM OPERATION, and Chapter V GENERAL
RULES APPLICABLE TO TRANSMISSION SYSTEM OPERATORS.

 

Having said that, we can suggest the following reading:

 

·         [2]Roundtable on the role of energy storage in the energy system
of the future (May 2019)

·         “[3]Study on energy storage – Contribution to the security of
the electricity supply in Europe”, published by the Commission in May 2020

 

Kind regards,

 

Marcelo MASERA

Head of Unit "Energy Security, Distribution and Markets"

European Commission

Joint Research Centre

Directorate C "Energy, Transport and Climate"

 

P.O. Box 2

1755 ZG Petten

the Netherlands

 

Tel fixed: +31 (0)224 565403
Tel mob: +31 (0)6 5393 0379

 

[email address]

 

 

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MASERA Marcelo, Centre commun de recherche

MASERA Marcelo (JRC-PETTEN) would like to recall the message, "Access to documents request - Battery Energy Storage Systems".

MASERA Marcelo, Centre commun de recherche

Link: [1]File-List
Link: [2]Edit-Time-Data
Link: [3]themeData
Link: [4]colorSchemeMapping

[5]Ares(2021)903501 - Access to documents request - Battery Energy Storage
Systems

Sent by MASERA Marcelo (JRC) <[email address]>. All responses
have to be sent to this email address.
Envoyé par MASERA Marcelo (JRC) <[email address]>. Toutes les
réponses doivent être effectuées à cette adresse électronique.

Dear Mr. Crawford,

 

We understand that your question refers to the treatment of storage
systems (including batteries) in the regulation of energy markets/systems.

 

On this, there is no "classification" or set of classification rules
impossed by the EU. The detailed regulation of energy markets is a
national issue. Hence, such questions should be addressed to the national
energy regulators.

 

We are the JRC do not carry out work on the topic as it has not been of
immediate relevance for European policies.

 

The general rules relevant to this topic are set in the [6]Directive on
common rules for the internal market for electricity (EU) 2019/944, but
–as you might know- it only sets basic rules in line with previous
legislation, such as the following statements from the provisions:

 

(62) System operators should not own, develop, manage or operate energy
storage facilities. In the new electricity market design, energy storage
services should be market-based and competitive. Consequently,
cross-subsidisation between energy storage and the regulated functions of
distribution or transmission should be avoided. Such restrictions on the
ownership of energy storage facilities is to prevent distortion of
competition, to eliminate the risk of discrimination, to ensure fair
access to energy storage services to all market participants and to foster
the effective and efficient use of energy storage facilities, beyond the
operation of the distribution or transmission system. That requirement
should be interpreted and applied in accordance with the rights and
principles established under the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the
European Union (the ‘Charter’), in particular the freedom to conduct a
business and the right to property guaranteed by Articles 16 and 17 of the
Charter.

(63) Where energy storage facilities are fully integrated network
components that are not used for balancing or for congestion management,
they should not, subject to approval by the regulatory authority, be
required to comply with the same strict limitations for system operators
to own, develop, manage or operate those facilities. Such fully integrated
network components can include energy storage facilities such as
capacitors or flywheels which provide important services for network
security and reliability, and contribute to the synchronisation of
different parts of the system.

 

(64) With the objective of progress towards a completely decarbonised
electricity sector that is fully free of emissions, it is necessary to
make progress in seasonal energy storage. Such energy storage is an
element that would serve as a tool for the operation of the electricity
system to allow for short-term and seasonal adjustment, in order to cope
with variability in the production of electricity from renewable sources
and the associated contingencies in those horizons.

 

Then, other elements of interest in that Directive are given in the
definitions:

 

(51) ‘fully integrated network components’ means network components that
are integrated in the transmission or distribution system, including
storage facilities, and that are used for the sole purpose of ensuring a
secure and reliable operation of the transmission or distribution system,
and not for balancing or congestion management;

 

And further down in the Directive there are generic references to storage
systems in Chapter IV DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM OPERATION, and Chapter V GENERAL
RULES APPLICABLE TO TRANSMISSION SYSTEM OPERATORS.

 

Having said that, we can suggest the following reading:

 

o [7]Roundtable on the role of energy storage in the energy system of
the future (May 2019)
o “[8]Study on energy storage – Contribution to the security of the
electricity supply in Europe”, published by the Commission in May 2020

 

Kind regards,

 

Marcelo MASERA

Head of Unit "Energy Security, Distribution and Markets"

European Commission

Joint Research Centre

Directorate C "Energy, Transport and Climate"

 

P.O. Box 2

1755 ZG Petten

the Netherlands

 

Tel fixed: +31 (0)224 565403
Tel mob: +31 (0)6 5393 0379

 

[9][email address]

 

 

Afficher les sections citées